Menu
Facebook Twitter ePetition

Below is a collection of images to illustrate stories about National Highways' infilling and demolition of Historial Railways Estate structures. Media organisations are authorised to use these images as long as the specified credit is included within the relevant publication.

Click on the thumbnail image to download a high-res version.

 

Barcombe bridge

Barcombe protest

A community campaign against National Highways’ proposed plan for the bridge has been launched.

Credit: The HRE Group (2.09MB)

Barcombe community

Locals gather beneath the bridge to discuss their strategy to combat the infill scheme.

Credit: The HRE Group (2.14MB)

Barcombe gathering

Locals gather beneath the bridge to discuss their strategy to combat the infill scheme.

Credit: The HRE Group (1.94MB)

Barcombe campaigner

Hazel Fell Rayner, the local campaign organiser, signs the community's letter against the infilling scheme.

Credit: The HRE Group (1.16MB)

Barcombe defects

Cracks developed in three of the bridge’s wing walls at some time prior to 1994.

Credit: The HRE Group (1.76MB)

Barcombe parapets

The bridge’s parapets are cracked at all four corners of the span.

Credit: The HRE Group (1.79MB)

Barcombe cyclists

Two cyclists pass over the bridge which has a weight restriction of 20 tonnes.

Credit: The HRE Group (1.84MB)

 

Great Musgrave bridge

Great Musgrave bridge

The bridge at Great Musgrave comprises a masonry arch and is needed for a planned connection between the Eden Valley and Stainmore heritage railways.

Credit: The HRE Group (2.35MB)

Great Musgrave bridge infilling

Great Musgrave bridge was infilled in May and June 2021 without planning permission and in the complete absence of dialogue with the two railways who need access beneath it.

Credit: The HRE Group (2.58MB)

Great Musgrave bridge infilled

Great Musgrave bridge was infilled using hundreds of tonnes of aggregate and foamed concrete, create an environmental blight and loss of a useful legacy structure.

Credit: The HRE Group (2.32MB)

Great Musgrave bridge south

Concrete oozes from the arch on the south side of Great Musgrave bridge.

Credit: The HRE Group (2.08MB)

 

Toller Porcorum bridge

Toller Porcorum bridge

In October 2021, National Highways' contractor accessed property and felled trees without consent from the three affected landowners.

Credit: Richard Sims (1.04MB)

Toller Porcorum flood

The shredded timber from the tree felling caused the road drains to block, resulting in deep flooding.

Credit: Nigel Ewens (1.77MB)

Toller Porcorum trees

Trees were cut down on both sides of the bridge.

Credit: Richard Sims (1.02MB)

 

Stoke Road bridge

Stoke Road bridge route

An aerial view across Stoke Road bridge, showing the old railway which is proposed for repurposing as a walking and cycling route.

Credit: The HRE Group (1.58MB)

Stoke Road bridge deck

The bridge carries a little-used country lane over the former Mid-Hants Railway which opened in 1865.

Credit: The HRE Group (1.85MB)

Stoke Road bridge

Uncontrolled ivy growth has caused localised mortar loss to the bridge’s parapets, spandrels and arch ring face, but these defects are minor.

Credit: The HRE Group (2.28MB)

 

Horspath bridge demolition

Horspath protest

On 24 February 2021, villagers gather on a bridge at Horspath to protest against National Highways' intended demolition of the structure that is valued locally as a traffic-calming measure and wildlife corridor.

Credit: Helen Morgan (264kB)

Horspath protest aerial

On 24 February 2021, villagers gather on a bridge at Horspath to protest against National Highways' intended demolition of the structure that is valued locally as a traffic-calming measure and wildlife corridor.

Credit: Simon Logan (2.53MB)

Horspath bridge

The structure is valued locally as a traffic-calming measure and wildlife corridor.

Credit: The HRE Group (2.23MB)

 

Notable bridges under threat

Alnwick bridge

One of two bridges intended for infilling on the route of the proposed Alnwick Greenway which would head out of town into the fabulous Northumberland countryside.

Credit: The HRE Group (2.55MB)

Brunel bridge

Isambard Kingdom Brunel engineered this bridge for the Cornwall Railway in the 1860s, but National Highways told Cornwall Council that it needs to be infilled "to prevent an emergency arising". It carries a little-used farm track and is 220m for the nearest public right of way.

Credit: The HRE Group (2.28MB)

Dukes Avenue bridge

At Alexandra Palace, National Highways intends to demolish this brick structure which forms part of a conservation area.

Credit: Matt Buck (2.09MB)

Fakenham bridge

The ambitious establishment of a Norfolk Orbital Railway would be prejudiced by National Highways' proposed infilling scheme of this bridge near Fakenham.

Credit: Norfolk Orbital Railway (2.07MB)

Hackney Bottom bridge

A future phase of the National Highways-funded Newbury-Didcot Railway Path will pass beneath this bridge near Hackney Bottom, but only if another part of National Highways doesn't infill it first.

Credit: The HRE Group (2.06MB)

Kinnersley bridge

One of four at-risk bridges spanning the route of the proposed Hereford-Hay Greenway. Two were the subject of planning applications for infilling, but Herefordshire Council rejected them.

Credit: The HRE Group (2.22MB)

Lochanhead bridge

The Dumfries-Stranraer railway is being considered for reopening as part of the South West Scotland Transport Study, but National Highways plans to infill this bridge, blocking the route and weakening the business case.

Credit: The HRE Group (2.33MB)

Pont Llanio bridge

Pont Llanio bridge spans the former Carmarthen-Aberystwyth railway which would form part of a strategic north-south link through west Wales. A campaign group wants it to be reopened for social purposes and the Welsh Government has conducted a study.

Credit: Bob Morgan (2.0MB)

Pugeston bridge

Protected by a Grade C listing due to its unusual construction form, this bridge at Pugeston in Angus could span an extension of the Caledonian Railway if National Highways is prevented from infilling it.

Credit: Simon Douglas (1.9MB)

Staward Station bridge

Staward Station is Northumberland has been delightfully restored, but holidaymakers staying in the former waiting room could soon be looking out at concrete infill if National Highways gets its way.

Credit: The HRE Group (1.43MB)

Tilekilns bridge

This bridge at Kirtlebridge - just over the Scottish border - is used as a wildlife corridor and forms the only access route onto three acres of a farmer's property. But despite a Minister's assurance that National Highways would endeavour to retain access beneath any bridge where an interest is identified, the structure will be infilled.

Credit: The HRE Group (1.68MB)

Troutbeck bridge

Contractor AMCO-Giffen progresses the partial infilling of a bridge on the former Penrith-Keswick branch in the Lake District which is the focus of a longstanding reopening campaign. The new arched opening is not big enough to accommodate a train.

Credit: The HRE Group (1.87MB)

Uplawmoor bridge

Three unusual concrete bridges are needed for the Neilston-Uplawmoor Community Link in East Renfrewshire which is currently at the detailed design stage. National Highways would scupper the project if it goes ahead with its threat to infill them.

Credit: Ross Cowan (2.07MB)

 

Converted bridges

Heckmondwike bridges

A series of impressive bridges span a cutting on a section of cycle path at Heckmondwike, West Yorkshire.

Credit: The HRE Group (1.64MB)

Little Petherick bridge

A bridge carries cyclists over Little Petherick Creek near Padstow, Cornwall, on a cycle trail.

Credit: The HRE Group (1.37MB)

Keswick bridge

Walkers and cyclists pass beneath a masonry bridge on a section of the Keswick-Threlkeld railway path in the Lake District.

Credit: The HRE Group (1.94MB)

About Us

The HRE Group is an alliance of walking, cycling and heritage campaigners, engineers and greenway developers who regard the Historical Railways Estate’s structures to be strategically valuable in the context of building a better future.

Last updated 28 June 2022
© 2022 The HRE Group